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Courtesy of Connor Archer
My Life With Autism

Two texts explore what it’s like to have autism.

By Jessica Press
From the February 2018 Issue

Learning Objective: to synthesize information from a personal essay and an interview, and write an essay

Lexile: 940L (combined)
Topic: SEL,
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Activities (3)
Quizzes (2)
Quizzes (2)
Answer Key (1)
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Activities (3) Download All Quizzes and Activities
Quizzes (2)
Quizzes (2)
Answer Key (1)
Step-by-Step Lesson Plan

Close Reading, Critical Thinking, Skill Building

1. PREPARING TO READ 

2. READING AND DISCUSSING  

3. SKILL BUILDING 

Differentiated Writing Prompts
For On-Level Readers

Why is it important to understand autism? Support your answer with details from both the personal essay and the interview.

For Struggling Readers

In a well-organized paragraph, explain one challenge Connor faced and how he dealt with it.

For Advanced Readers

“Sometimes it is the people no one can imagine anything of who do the things no one can imagine,” said Alan Turing. (Turing created the first computer used to break codes during World War II and had autism.) What did he mean? How does this idea apply to Connor? Answer both questions in a well-organized essay.

Customized Performance Tasks
For Budding Scientists

Find a doctor who specializes in autism. Interview that doctor about what autism is and what kind of research is currently being done on autism. Present your findings in an essay or short presentation.

For History Lovers

Choose one figure from history who had (or likely had) autism (such as Temple Grandin). Research that person’s life. Then write an essay or create a video about that person.

Literature Connection: Novels featuring characters with autism

Anything But Typical 
by Terreece Clarke

Mockingbird 
by Kathryn Erskine

Rules 
by Cynthia Lord