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Meet your most important ELA objectives with
Scope’s engaging multi-genre content, rich
skill-building support material, and thrilling videos.

October 10, 2011

 

SCOPE ONLINE
Skills-based reading and writing activities for each Scope article

Jump directly to an article’s resources:
NARRATIVE NONFICTION: Head Trauma
READERS THEATER PLAY: The Curse of King Tut

THEN & NOW: How to Survive Stardom
DEBATE/ESSAY KIT: Would You Clone Your Dog?
LAZY EDITOR: Why Is That Guy Stuffing His Face?

YOU WRITE IT: What It Really Means To Be Beautiful
GRAMMAR ON TELEVISION: Accept vs. Except

ANSWER KEY
DOWNLOAD ALL PRINTABLES FOR THIS ISSUE
HELPFUL LINKS & DOWNLOADS


Head Trauma

SUMMARY: Students will be deeply moved by our story of 13-year-old Zack Lystedt, who suffered a life-changing series of concussions playing football. They will also read about the concussion crisis in youth sports and the NFL. Skill focus: author’s purpose; persuasive-writing strategies

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Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied.

 

FEATURED SKILL: AUTHOR’S PURPOSE/PERSUASIVE WRITING

VOCABULARY
A list of tricky words that appear in the article, to print or project. Includes a practice activity to reinforce understanding.

READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A test-prep essential! We formed these questions based on state tests.

IDENTIFYING NONFICTION ELEMENTS: READ, THINK, EXPLAIN
Use our teacher-vetted, scaffolded reading activity to help students improve their nonfiction reading-comprehension skills and strategies. Includes text-structure questions.

CRITICAL THINKING
Short-answer questions for independent completion (great for your above-level readers!) or group discussion. These are also listed in our T.E. and can be projected on your whiteboard.

MULTIMEDIA
VIDEO: TEEN’S LIFE-CHANGING GAME
Dr. Drew Pinsky interviews Zackery Lystedt and his father Victor. Length: 5:45.
NOTE: An ad appears before the clip starts, so we recommend loading before your class begins.


The Curse
of King Tut

SUMMARY: In our exciting play, Howard Carter discovers and opens the tomb of the ancient Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamen, unleashing what some people said was a terrible curse. Skill focus: supporting evidence

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Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied.


DOWNLOAD THE TEACHER’S EDITION LESSON PLAN.

FEATURED SKILL: SUPPORTING EVIDENCE


VOCABULARY
A list of tricky words that appear in the play, to print or project. Includes a practice activity to reinforce understanding.

READING-COMPREHENSION QUIZ
A test-prep essential! We formed these questions based on state tests.

CRITICAL THINKING
Short-answer questions for independent completion (great for your above-level readers!) or group discussion. These are also listed in our T.E. and can be projected onto your whiteboard.

MULTIMEDIA
VIDEO: KING TUT UNWRAPPED
A fun clip from the Discovery Channel about collecting DNA samples from the mummy of King Tut. Length: 2:06. NOTE: An ad appears before the clip starts, so we recommend loading before your class begins.

VIDEO: THE PHARAOH’S CURSE
National Geographic explores the mystery of the curse, as well as what we know about Tut himself today. Length: 4:10. NOTE: An ad appears before the clip starts, so we recommend loading before your class begins.


How to
Survive Stardom

SUMMARY: Students read an essay about Selena Gomez and a newspaper feature–style article about Drew Barrymore’s rocky transition from troubled young star to Hollywood leading lady. Then they compare the two articles and relate them to a quote about early fame. Skill focus: comparing and contrasting; making connections between texts

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied.

COMPARE-AND-CONTRAST GRAPHIC ORGANIZER
A graphic organizer helps students compare the two articles—in preparation for responding to the writing prompt on page 19. Great for those who need more scaffolding.

COMPARE-AND-CONTRAST QUIZ
Multiple-choice questions require students to analyze and compare the two texts. Makes great test prep.

READING-COMPREHENSION CROSSWORD PUZZLE
A fun way to check reading comprehension.


Would You
Clone Your Dog?

SUMMARY: Should pet owners be able to clone their beloved animals? Your students decide. Skill focus: supporting an argument; identifying main ideas and details

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied.

GUIDED OPINION ESSAY
Our self-guided worksheet makes essay writing a painless process. Includes two bonus handouts: transition words and a self-edit checklist. Great for homework!


Why Is That
Guy Stuffing
His Face?

SUMMARY: Students get an inside look at the fascinating (and kind of gross) world of competitive eating. Then they edit our article for mistakes. Skill focus: conventions of standard English; revision

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Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied.

APOSTROPHE PRACTICE
Students review the rules, then practice using apostrophes.

RUN-ON SENTENCES
Students get tips on how to identify and correct run-on sentences. Then they rewrite a series of run-ons.

WORD VARIATION PRACTICE
This worksheet offers strategies to help students enliven their writing by varying their word choices. Great for more advanced writers.

PUNCTUATING QUOTATIONS
After a review of the rules, students correct punctuation and capitalization in a series of sentences.

SPELLING
The spell-checker doesn’t catch everything! Students practice: ive, itive, or ative; ch or tch; and the silent p.


What Does It
Really Mean
To Be Beautiful?

SUMMARY: Students write a short article based on our interview with an amazing 13-year-old who shaved her head to raise money for childhood-cancer research. Skill focus: identifying main idea and details; summarizing

GET A PDF OF THIS ARTICLE TO PROJECT
Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied.


CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Use our handy form to enter students’ work in this contest. Read more about our contests here.


Grammar On Television

SUMMARY: Students practice the correct use of accept and except in these fun factoids about TV shows. Skill focus: accept vs. except

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Note: This PDF cannot be printed or copied.
More practice with these commonly confused words.
ANSWER KEY
Looking for answers? Visit our top-secret Web site for answers to all reproducibles, quizzes, and activities. The URL is listed on page T-3 of your printed Teacher’s Edition.

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HELPFUL LINKS & DOWNLOADS
TEACHER’S EDITION

Misplaced your TE? No worries! Download it here. Note: This online version does NOT include the answer key or the URL for the answer key.

COMMON CORE, NCTE, AND IRA STANDARDS
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