Meet your most important ELA objectives with
Scope’s engaging multi-genre content, rich
skill-building support material, and thrilling videos.

x

 
 

See what’s coming up in your May issue!

Narrative Nonfiction

Lost in Death Valley

This riveting story follows three women who find themselves stranded and lost in one of the most dangerous places on Earth: Death Valley. The article is packed with sensory details, descriptive writing, and fascinating information about Death Valley National Park.

Featured skill: descriptive writing

 

Drama

Light

Our fascinating play is a fictionalized portrayal of the events leading up to Thomas Edison’s invention of the incandescent light bulb. We’ve paired the play with a narrative essay about life in the 1820s.

Featured skill: drawing conclusions

 

Fiction: First-Line Contest Winner!

The Secret Ingredient by
Lemony Snicket

Award-winning author Lemony Snicket brings beloved characters from his series, All the Wrong Questions, to the pages of Scope, with all the dark humor that made Snicket famous. This delightful story is based on this year’s winning line from our First Line Contest.

Featured skill: point of view

 

Paired Texts:
Literary Nonfiction and Essay

The World’s First Superstar

Students explore how attitudes about wild animals have changed over time after reading two moving and thought-provoking texts about the history of circus elephants: a nonfiction article about Jumbo, celebrity elephant of the 1800s, and an essay about essay about the plan to remove elephants from the Ringling Bros. circus by 2018.

Featured skill: synthesis

 

Debate

Is It Wrong to Photoshop Celebrities?

Cora, Katie, and Isabella want the magazine Teen World to ban Photoshop. Teen World’s editor disagrees. Who makes the best argument? Your students decide.

 

 
Scope Magazine 'You Write It' article cover image

You Write It

I Woke Up My School

Students turn our interview with 18-year-old Jilly Dos Santos, who got her school to push back it’s starting time, into an article.

 

 

Grammar

Grammar Goes Surfing

Students practice using less and fewer while reading about big-wave surfing.